‘Orlando’ by Virginia Woolf Review

It’s incredible to think that this novel was published in 1928. To consider that this book, which abandons gender and age conventions, was penned at the same time P.G. Wodehouse was writing ‘Jeeves and Wooster’ is quite remarkable. Social niceties were no trivial matter in the 1920's - they were the mainstay of society. But Woolf abandoned all conventions both stylistically and thematically when she wrote 'Orlando'.

‘The Silence of the Girls’ by Pat Barker Review

Barker’s novel is set during the ten-year war that culminated in King Agamemnon sacking the city of Troy. It is ‘The Iliad’, but not as we know it. Unlike Homer’s story, ‘The Silence of the Girls’ recounts the war from the point of view of the women captured during the siege and questions the status … Continue reading ‘The Silence of the Girls’ by Pat Barker Review

Three Shakespearean Story Arcs Present in ‘Star wars’

Shakespeare's story arcs are timeless. For more information on how 'Star Wars' films 1-6 trace the plot of 'Julius Caesar' (but with more spaceships and midichlorians than the bard perhaps envisaged), read this post. I won't be revisiting it on this occasion. Here are three additional times, complete with a quotation from the bard, that … Continue reading Three Shakespearean Story Arcs Present in ‘Star wars’

‘Quiet: the Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking’ by Susan Cain Review

'Quiet' is a well-researched book that spoke volumes, at low-volume, to me. The book explores introverts from a ‘cultural’ point of view. It’s primary concern is the age-old dichotomy between the “man of action” and the “man of contemplation” and how we can improve the world if only there was a greater balance of power … Continue reading ‘Quiet: the Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop Talking’ by Susan Cain Review

Five Iconic Fantasy Films That are Based on Books

'The Last Unicorn' by Peter S. Beagle There is a reason that this is top of the list. This singularly solemn yet beautiful film came out in 1982. It stole my heart and never gave it back. Mia Farrow’s aching audio and Christopher Lee’s contemptuous King cemented the film as one of the most powerful … Continue reading Five Iconic Fantasy Films That are Based on Books

‘Attack of the Clones’: Why I Love its Awful Script

*Contains spoilers about sand* The Star Wars prequels continue to divide audiences over two decades since ‘The Phantom Menace’ was released. They have been lambasted for a number of reasons, which include the quality of the script and acting. But what if their weakness is also their strength? Perhaps controversially, I thought that there was … Continue reading ‘Attack of the Clones’: Why I Love its Awful Script

‘She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement’ by Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey Review

In ‘She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story that Helped Ignite a Movement’, Kantor and Twohey reveal their journey to publishing the New York Times article that exposed Hollywood Producer Harvey Weinstein during his tenures at Miramax and the Weinstein Company.

‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight’ by Simon Armitage Review

Poet Simon Armitage retells the mediaeval epic poem that celebrates King Arthur’s nephew and Round Table devotee Sir Gawain. Fans of Arthurian legend might be delighted to know that a new film adaptation, starring Dev Patel as the chivalric hero, will be released later this year. Prepare to be officially wooed be the tightest tights, … Continue reading ‘Sir Gawain and the Green Knight’ by Simon Armitage Review

Why ‘Star Wars’ is a Modern ‘Julius Caesar’

It’s lockdown, and I’ve taken the opportunity to revisit ‘Star Wars’* with a literary hat on. Warning: contains intergalactic and Shakespearean spoilers. A long time ago, Shakespeare wrote his Elizabethan tragedy ‘Julius Caesar’. In the not so distant past, George Lucas wrote and directed the epic ‘Star Wars’ series of films. Although they are separated by … Continue reading Why ‘Star Wars’ is a Modern ‘Julius Caesar’

‘Fingers in the Sparkle Jar’ by Chris Packham Review

Naturalist, photographer and presenter Chris Packham recounts his early years in his unique memoir. Packham’s memoir explores, in a kaleidoscope of poetry and emotion, his experience of being a child and social outsider in 1970's Britain. During this time, he took solace in the solitude of nature and developed a life-long dedication and passion for … Continue reading ‘Fingers in the Sparkle Jar’ by Chris Packham Review